Lois S Bibbings is Professor of Law, Gender and History at the University of Bristol. She has been researching military conscientious objection, with a focus on the First World War, for nearly three decades and has spoken and published widely on the issue. Her 2009 book Telling Tales About Men looks at the ways in which conscientious objectors were viewed and treated during the Great War, arguing that objectors were seen as both heroes and cowards, as manly and effeminate, they were ostracised and revered and could be lauded as a source of national pride and castigated for their treachery – and positive responses could sometimes come from the most unlikely sources.

Her other work includes an interest in Victorian criminality (Binding Men, 2014). She is currently researching ‘conscience’ and working on a history of the Shot At Dawn campaign, which sought to gain pardons for soldiers executed by the British Army during World War One.

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