2nd Edition. Revised and substantially expanded.

In 2012 some radical historians poring over old maps of East Bristol came across a disused burial ground at Rosemary Green close to the site of Eastville Workhouse at 100 Fishponds Rd. Over the following years a team of local researchers revealed that more than 4,000 men, women and children, inmates of the workhouse, were interred in unmarked graves in Rosemary Green from 1851-1895. This book is a summary of their research and a history of Eastville Workhouse in the Victorian period. It also forms part of a community history project to both name the forgotten paupers of Rosemary Green and to memorialise them.

Eastville Workhouse, constructed by Clifton Poor Law Union in 1847, was the largest workhouse in the Bristol area. Housing over a thousand inmates, it was an institution produced by the introduction of the New Poor Law in 1834. Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods this book looks at what life in the Victorian workhouse was like, who the inmates were and how they were treated. It considers their life chances once they entered the institution and what happened to them after they passed away.

Revised and substantially expanded, this second edition of 100 Fishponds Rd contains new research concerning the treatment of tramps, children, the sick and the mentally ill and, through a collection of fascinating letters, the voices of the inmates.

 

With 47 graphs and illustrations.

Buy this book

£10.00 inc PP

PayPal Acceptance Mark

100 Fishponds Rd. Front Cover100 Fishponds Rd. Back Cover

1 Comment

  1. My 4th great grandfather William Henry Oxley may have been one of those buried in Rosemary Green. He is listed as a resident of the workhouse in the 1871 census and he died in 1876 at age 86. I would be very interested in obtaining a copy of the pamphlet “100 Fishponds Road”.

    William had a tragic life. He was a hosier and had a shop on Wine Street. A tragic fire in 1826 took the life of his wife and three of his children.

    Thanks,
    Jan Weaver

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This