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What we did on our summer holidays…#1

The Festival of Humanity and Pere Lachaise Cemetery

By Trish Mensah
The annual Fete d'Humanitie originally began in 1930 as a fund raiser for the Communist newspaper L'Humanitie. It was the idea of the editor of the paper in Paris and attracted 1,000 people. From 1937 foreign stalls were welcomed and it has grown yearly until now it is a huge three day event. This year there were more than 450 stalls,... More →

The Rosemary Green Memorial

Eastville Workhouse burial ground

On this site over 4000 men, women and children who died in Eastville Workhouse, known as 100 Fishponds Road, were buried in unmarked graves. A further 118 were given to the medical school. This memorial stands in regognition of all who lived and died in the workhouse. #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item... More →

Colston and slavery still obscured?

At last year’s Merchant Venturers Charter Day service at the cathedral the Bishop of Bristol, stated that Edward Colston had: lived a life of significance... [and there]... may be still some speculation on some of the circumstances around his business roots right here The Bishop of Bristol’s clumsy attempt to rewrite history, effectively... More →

From the Young Patriots to the Rainbow Coalition

A review of ‘Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels, and Black Power’

Introduction The last twenty years or so have seen a wave of publications recounting and examining the history of the New Left and radical Black, Latino and Native American organisations of the 1960s and 70s in the United States. Many of these books have been concerned with the spectacular exploits of these formations, particularly the armed... More →

Gallipoli and Bristol

By Ian Wright
The horses, the horses, we couldn't get the horses off the beach; we should not have been there A British veteran of Gallipoli In the Autumn of 1914 a number of men from Bristol were recruited into the 7th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. They spent the winter in billets in Basingstoke and then moved to Aldershot in February 1915 for final... More →

Arrowsmith and the ‘Bristol Revolution’ of 1831

By John Sidwell
I was fortunate enough to acquire, among a collection of books, both the 1884 and the considerably expanded 1906 edition of Arrowsmith’s Dictionary of Bristol, edited by Henry J. Spear and J. W. Arrowsmith. Concurrent with other research I have been conducting into the Bristol riots of 1831 I perused the entry in each edition and was struck by... More →

Do You Have A Conchie In The Family?

Many men signed up for the army in the early weeks of the war. As the reality of the war became clear at home, the numbers of volunteers rapidly fell. The war machine needed more men. In 1915 the Derby Scheme was introduced to register men for the armed forces and encourage recruitment. In early 1916 the Military Service Act became law introducing... More →