Christmas Webinar 4: Zionism and History

Reading the wrong lessons from the persecutions of the European Jews

Miscellaneous Events 2020
The talk will present an examination of the fundamental ideological basis of the Zionist movement going back to its founding by Herzel in 1896. Herzel attributed the historical persecutions of the Jews solely to an innate anti-Semitism on the part of the gentiles. He called it a Psychopathology which had no remedy. Actually, while anti-Semitism was always present to a greater or lesser degree, it does not explain why the attacks broke out where and when they did. It requires an examination of […]

Christmas Webinar 3: God’s Beautiful Sunshine – The 1921 Miners’ Lockout in the Forest of Dean

Miscellaneous Events 2020
In 1921, in response to a severe depression in the coal trade, colliery owners, supported by the government, slashed labour costs. Refusing to accept this cut in wages, a million British miners, including many war veterans, a were locked out of their pits. The consequences for the 6,000 Forest of Dean miners, their families and the whole community, was brutal. However, the miners fought a determined battle for an alternative which included public ownership of the mines with decent pay and […]

Christmas Webinar 2: Steps Against War – Resistance to World War 1 in Bedminster

Miscellaneous Events 2020
Emma Byron and Trevor Houghton present the story of a network of neighbours, workmates, families and comrades who stood together and refused to take their part in the war machine. Steps Against War is an innovative micro-history of resistance to war in a working-class district of south Bristol. The book grew out of a community project to create a history walk with puppets, and the talk will be illustrated with short videos and images of puppetry, as well as pictures from Bedminster in the […]

Christmas Webinar 1: Angela Carter’s ‘Provincial Bohemia’

Miscellaneous Events 2020
The first in our series of Christmas Webinars.... Acclaimed novelist and short-story writer Angela Carter lived in Clifton during the 1960s, where she wrote her early novels known as the 'Bristol Trilogy'. Steve Hunt will introduce some of the themes of his new Bristol Radical History Group Book: Angela Carter's 'Provincial Bohemia'; the Counterculture in 1960s and 1970s Bristol and Bath with a journey through the places and times that inspired her breakthrough works. You can join this one hour […]

It Felt Like Year One: A Tour of Angela Carter’s 1960s Bristol

Stephen E. Hunt of Bristol Radical History Group will be presenting an online tour, based on the Bristol Radical History Group publication Angela Carter's Provincial Bohemia': The Counterculture in 1960s and 1970s Bristol and Bath. This event is part of Being Human 2020, the national festival of the humanities. Angela Carter was one of the late 20th century’s most acclaimed novelists and came of age as a writer in 1960s Clifton, where she experienced life in post-war Bristol, looking at a […]

Bristol Festival of Literature: Colston, Fact And Fiction

This event is part of Bristol Festival of Literature and you can can register for the meeting here. In this two-part event authors Roger Ball and Mark Steeds of Bristol Radical History Group and Countering Colston discuss how facts, fictions and silences about the history of Edward Colston became part of the collective memory in the Victorian period and were subsequently challenged by historians, writers and artists. Ros Martin is a literary-based artist and activist of many years standing. She […]

Angela Carter and the Bristol counterculture [Postponed until further notice]

A radical history walk in Clifton and Hotwells

  Steve Hunt of Bristol Radical History Group will lead a stroll around some old haunts associated with Angela Carter and the 1960s and 1970s counterculture. Join Steve to reimagine the area around Hotwells and Clifton when it was a hotbed of what Angela Carter called ‘Provincial Bohemia. Angela Carter is widely appreciated as one of the most creative and engaging English writers of the late Twentieth Century, being author of such bestsellers as The Bloody Chamber, Nights at the Circus and […]

State Surveillance after the French Revolution [Postponed until further notice]

Government Surveillance in Peacetime: Home Office Spies, c.1800 (David Worrall) Government surveillance, using networks of spies and informers, were active both before and after the Napoleonic War (1793-1815). In the case of the Anabaptist, William Winterbotham, although in 1792 the country was still at peace, a spy was in place to intercept him on a West Country highway and lure him into seditious conversation. In the late 1810s and 1820s, when Britain was engaged in no major conflict, spies […]

Stolen Paradise [postponed until further notice]

The post-war squatting movement in Bristol

During the summer of 1946, thousands of British families took the law into their own hands to temporarily solve their housing problems by "requisitioning" empty military camps. This mass-squatting movement was rapid, spontaneous and entirely working-class in character. While it was often driven at ground level by women, the movement soon developed a formal leadership structure dominated by ex-servicemen who had served as NCOs and warrant officers. Bristol, with particularly acute housing […]