Bliss Mill Strike 1913-1914

This blog is an attempt to document the Bliss Mill strike of 1913-14 in real time. Discussion is welcomed via the comment feature. I would be particularly interested to hear of any family memories of the strike, or new information that can be added. I will aim for historical accuracy as far as possible. Where what I have to say is speculation and cannot be backed up by recorded facts I will do my best to indicate that.

Introducing Chipping Norton’s Real Heroes

The events in December to mark the 100th anniversary of the Bliss Mill stike in Chipping Norton have made this weekend's addition of The Morning Star. Chipping Norton, a small picturesque Cotswold market town in deepest Oxfordshire, will be associated in the minds of those who don't know it with a few notorious names. Those would be its local MP, one David Cameron, Rebekah Brooks, the disgraced former CEO of News International and the pompous television petrolhead Jeremy Clarkson. Needless to […]

Bliss Mill Strikers

Bliss Mill Front Cover
Bliss Tweed Mill: Prosecuted Strikers/Supporters, 1914 CN = Chipping Norton Name Address Age Started Work at Bliss Mill Occupation Sentence Re-engaged Walter Bowen 1 Finsbury Place, CN 25 Baker (his father, John, was a striker) Bound over 12 months John Bowen re-engaged 06/11/1916 Annie Cooper 16 Spring Street, CN 50 About 1888 Machine Feeder 14 days No Charles A Dixon 4 London Road, CN 21 About 1905 Yarn Store Hand Bound over 12 months No John (Jack) Gee 3 Kimberly Place, West Street, CN 29 […]

Bliss Tweed Mill Strike, 1913–14

Causes, Conduct and Consequences

Bliss Mill Front Cover
Eighteenth of December 2013 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the commencement of the Bliss Tweed Mill strike in Chipping Norton. The years 1910 to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 witnessed an upsurge in strike activity in Great Britain and Ireland involving many thousands of workers. By the summer of 1914, strikes, in the coal, cotton, transport, metal, engineering, shipbuilding and building industries, were viewed by the government as a crisis of severe proportions. This […]

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