Cry Freedom, Cry World Heritage Site

In 1787 abolitionist Thomas Clarkson researched the slave trade with help from Landlord Thompson while staying at The Seven Stars public house in Bristol. This pamphlet looks at how the histories of the pub and the abolition movement are intertwined, and why it should be the first pub to have UNESCO World Heritage status.

The Seven Stars public house is one of the most important buildings in the entire history of Bristol, if not the country.  It stands as a symbol of the resistance that grew towards the vile slave trade, and needs recognition on a global scale.  The spirit of freedom and progressive humanism that must have been evident here in Thomas Clarkson’s day is a testament to the power of the few, fighting to bring about positive change for the many.

Paul Wratten – Landlord of The Seven Stars, 2010

Cry Freedom, Cry Seven Stars Front CoverCry Freedom, Cry Seven Stars Back Cover

1 Comment

  1. I am delighted that further recognition maybe gained for Clarkson,Thompson and the Stars and of course to yourselves. great work. I am still researching Landlord Thompson when I have the time. Thank you all.

    Steve and Katy

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